Pet Safety

Pets are part of the family.

Pets are part of the family

MAKE THEM PART OF YOUR FAMILY ESCAPE PLAN

Picture of dog

A LITTLE PREPARATION GOES A LONG WAY

Preparation is the key to making sure our loved ones stay safe. And that includes your pets, no matter how big or small, whether they have fur of fins!

IDENTIFICATION AND TRANSPORTATION

  • Collars and Licenses – Make sure your pets wear collars and two tags 1) their license AND 2) a tag with their name and your contact number.
  • Microchips – Your vet will implant the chip in your pet (usually around their neck area). Most vets will then register the chip with the manufacturer, but it’s up to you to keep your contact information up-to-date.
  • Carrier – Even if your pet doesn’t normally travel in a carrier, you still need to have a properly sized one for each of your pets. Many disaster shelters that accept pets won’t unless the pet is in a carrier. And don’t forget to write your pet’s name, your name and your contact information on each carrier.
  • Car Safety – Your pets should travel in your car only if they are secured. Just like you wear a seat belt, so should they, or they should travel in a secured carrier.
  • Extras At the Ready – Keep an extra leash in your car.

TRAINING

  • Train your pet to willingly enter the pet transport. This should ideally begin when they’re a puppy, kitten, etc. If they understand the transport before a crisis, it will be far easier to get them to comply when evacuating is time sensitive.
  • Train your dog to walk on a leash. When evacuating in a disaster, this is a necessary skill.
  • Practice transporting your pets by putting them in their transporters and going for a ride in the vehicle you’re most likely to use in the event of an evacuation.

SHELTERING IN PLACE

It is sometimes safer for you to shelter in place. This depends on myriad circumstances. Often during certain disasters, like hi-rise building fires, first responders will direct you to shelter in place because your home is deemed safe and a mass evacuation could clog stairwells and hallways needed for firefighters and equipment. If you’re directed to shelter in place:

  • Select a safe room – an interior room with no (or few) windows is best.
  • Cover the windows – Using drapes, blinds, shutters or even blankets and sheets.
  • Remove any toxic chemicals or plants.
  • Close off small areas – frightened cats and other pets will hide in emergencies. Think about areas where they might get stuck (vents, beneath heavy furniture, etc).

DISASTER TIPS

FEMA
SPCA
City of Los Angeles Animal Services

FINDING EMERGENCY SHELTERS

In the case of widespread disasters like earthquakes and wildfires, agencies set up shelters for evacuees. Some, BUT NOT ALL, of these shelters except pets. To find out who does when a disaster strikes contact:

  • Area veterinary clinics
  • Area boarding facilities
  • Local animal shelters
  • Humane Society website
  • Don’t forget family or friends outside the evacuation area
  • Pet-friendly hotels if it’s in the budget

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